Carrying a heavy passenger

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Ian Frog
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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by Ian Frog » Wed Mar 04, 2020 7:38 pm

For what its worth with novice or less experienced passengers regardless of weight I tell them imagine a straight line marking the position of my spine and try to maintain the same position, then once you are relaxed feel free to look over my shoulder and see into the bends.
Has worked for me for years including recently taking a petrified (and prejudiced) novice and making them an enthusiastic person looking forward to trips out in the coming year.
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cepal
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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by cepal » Wed Mar 04, 2020 9:08 pm

I tell them pretty much the same but in simpler words: "hold me tight and do whatever you feel I am doing with my body, just dong bang your helmet on mine please; shortly, these moves will come natural to you and you then no longer have to hold me as tight" :-). Those who it doesn't come up natural after a while and still tend to pull my rear end out of the bends even at slow speed, simply fail to qualify for my pillion, simples...
Ian Frog wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 7:38 pm
For what its worth with novice or less experienced passengers regardless of weight I tell them imagine a straight line marking the position of my spine and try to maintain the same position, then once you are relaxed feel free to look over my shoulder and see into the bends.
Has worked for me for years including recently taking a petrified (and prejudiced) novice and making them an enthusiastic person looking forward to trips out in the coming year.
Cheers
Ian

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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by elwon20 » Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:25 pm

cepal wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 5:05 pm
Nice ;-) (esp. the backpedalling). Good idea to let her get off for a U-turn! Just may I ask what bike do you ride and do you worry about the admissible payload of the bike (by the official paperwork), or not really? As that's my concern - we will definitely exceed that, and with some luggage for a longer trip, there is no bike in the world which has such a payload as us plus the little bit of luggage. After I get down to my planned/desired weight and her staying where she is, we'll be at the maximum payload of BMW K1300GT, that's naked, without wearing any bike gear ;-). I know there were people who did outlanding on R1150/1200GS two-up with really heavy luggage carrying up to double of the admissible payload, but they had welded reinfoced rear subframe, and many of them broke that anyway, due to extra stress on offroad trails with all the weight on it - well I certainly do not plan offroading two-up, yet even with some extra cargo, for that she'd definitely need to get her own bike indeed.
elwon20 wrote:
Wed Mar 04, 2020 4:03 pm
When I was 20 I weighed around 9.5st and I took my 18st mate on the back of my old SRAD 750, not a problem besides the thing seriously wanting to wheelie with the tiniest twist of the throttle. Adjusting the preload first might have helped but honestly, I doubt it would have made that much difference without completely re-springing it!

I often take my Mrs on the back of my bike, she's a little heavier than me (less and less so these days!), again, not a problem. The only time it becomes an issue is during maneuvres. Or if I'm too lazy to adjust the preload and start pushing it around bends, then the pegs will grind.

If we have to u-turn I'll make her get off, I could probably manage, but why risk it? Also reversing (backpedalling) up an incline becomes an exercise in futility where hilarity and visor steaming laughter is bound to ensue with each and every attempt

"It's not so steep,.. I can do this... wait... hang on..."
3 minutes of duck-waddling and 0.5cm later: "Okay get just get off" :lol:
GSXR 1000, and we haven't done more than a couple of hour trip with a break about halfway. Anything more would be super uncomfortable for her, it's really not a bike for comfortable 2-up touring! We have some creature comforts though. An anti-slip seat cover and a set of strap-on love handles which make a huge difference for both of us. She has her own bike now so pillion rides are fewer and farther between but she still likes to ride pillion occasionally. Long journey's we take two bikes. Toured mid-wales last summer.

TBH I've never even checked the admissible payload! But I'd wear my gear and exceed it rather than ride naked and stay under it! :lol: :lol: :lol:

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S-Westerly
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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by S-Westerly » Thu Mar 05, 2020 7:01 pm

[/quote]


TBH I've never even checked the admissible payload! But I'd wear my gear and exceed it rather than ride naked and stay under it! :lol: :lol: :lol:
[/quote]

Thank God for that.
Back in the blue. No bikes.....

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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by onesea » Thu Mar 05, 2020 11:34 pm

elwon20 wrote:
Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:25 pm
An anti-slip seat cover and a set of strap-on love handles which make a huge difference for both of us.
We gave up on Anti slip seat cover she learned it was comfier to change position occasionally, love handles are just good so she has some where comfy to put her hands. She is now confident enough to that shes noted to not use them at the most inappropriate moment.
Filtering shes been seen to "tap" wing mirrors of cars that have moved to block :shock: , her hand signals have been noted to be the ones not in the highway code :up: .
If she gets carried away a blip on the throttle and she reaches for the love handles :twisted: , although the abuse I then get in the head set :oops: , I have learned not to :| .
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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by elwon20 » Fri Mar 06, 2020 8:50 am

onesea wrote:
Thu Mar 05, 2020 11:34 pm
elwon20 wrote:
Thu Mar 05, 2020 5:25 pm
An anti-slip seat cover and a set of strap-on love handles which make a huge difference for both of us.
We gave up on Anti slip seat cover she learned it was comfier to change position occasionally, love handles are just good so she has some where comfy to put her hands. She is now confident enough to that shes noted to not use them at the most inappropriate moment.
Filtering shes been seen to "tap" wing mirrors of cars that have moved to block :shock: , her hand signals have been noted to be the ones not in the highway code :up: .
If she gets carried away a blip on the throttle and she reaches for the love handles :twisted: , although the abuse I then get in the head set :oops: , I have learned not to :| .
Yeah, I imagine both the cover and the handles are very bike and riding style dependant...

The seat on the GSXR is basically a child's seat, the grip cover doesn't stop her moving about but allows her a touch more friction under braking. The handles also make life much easier for us both under braking. They tend to transfer weight down and through the bike rather than her through her arms on the tank or what I feared before we tried them which was forwards and through me!

Before I introduced both of those she would end up on my seat at least once a ride. Again, likely because I was too lazy to adjust the preload appropriately.

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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by Throttled » Fri Mar 06, 2020 7:50 pm

An 18 stone pillion on a Harley just made the bike feel more planted. My usual pillion is half that and I was surprised at how little difference there was.
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cepal
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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by cepal » Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:21 pm

by "planted", do you mean "now I know why it's so slow - it's because we are heavy", where as without the pillion, there is lack of excuses to throw in? :D ... don't worry my old flying brick has 75 ponies (and still can do two-up with 20+ stone pillion, as long as I have the uprated rear shock, but that's without luggage and I am worried about the subframe - however checkint payload of other models which used the same frame and same generation of cardan shaft, the frame/subframe/... should have much higher capacity, they just designed the suspension for lower weight, so the rear shock upgrade (and cautious stopping/slowing down) all should be HOPEFULLY fine :)
Throttled wrote:
Fri Mar 06, 2020 7:50 pm
An 18 stone pillion on a Harley just made the bike feel more planted. My usual pillion is half that and I was surprised at how little difference there was.

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Re: Carrying a heavy passenger

Post by Throttled » Fri Mar 13, 2020 6:10 pm

cepal wrote:
Wed Mar 11, 2020 7:21 pm
by "planted", do you mean "now I know why it's so slow - it's because we are heavy", where as without the pillion, there is lack of excuses to throw in? :D ... don't worry my old flying brick has 75 ponies (and still can do two-up with 20+ stone pillion, as long as I have the uprated rear shock, but that's without luggage and I am worried about the subframe - however checkint payload of other models which used the same frame and same generation of cardan shaft, the frame/subframe/... should have much higher capacity, they just designed the suspension for lower weight, so the rear shock upgrade (and cautious stopping/slowing down) all should be HOPEFULLY fine :)
Throttled wrote:
Fri Mar 06, 2020 7:50 pm
An 18 stone pillion on a Harley just made the bike feel more planted. My usual pillion is half that and I was surprised at how little difference there was.
I could feel the bike was lower and so the centre of gravity felt lower.
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