BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Oil & Water Pump

#31 Post by wollyjumperuk » Wed Aug 01, 2018 9:32 pm

With the Oil & Water Pump being located on the front of the engine it takes a fair old beating during use, so it was due a bit of attention.

This beating was seen by just how stuck on the cover was, this had to be pushed out from behind...

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... and the residual coolant left to drain before the mounting bolts could be removed to release the whole assembly.

From a good look at the pump no leaks were evident and none were experienced on riding the bike, so only a good clean up was needed...

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... as the paintwork was in bad shape.

All the loose paint pretty much fell off, with the stubborn bits being helped off with a combination of wire brush and No. 1 Green Paint Stripper ...

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... before a good clean got it ready to mask up.

The pump was masked up with the old gasket making technique used to ensure a perfect fit.

The pump then had 4 coats of Halfords Engine Enamel before being left to cure and then being removed of the masking...

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... before everything was bought back together and the o-rings, bolts and washers were replaced with new items or upgrades (mainly with stainless bolts.

The unit was rebuilt, pressure relief valve plug and internals...

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... before pressure sensors and pump prepared for refitting.

The mating face was given alight smear of sealant, as there is no gasket for this, and the drive cog fitted to ensure alignment...

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... before the drive cog being refitted to the engine as well as the new o-ring (smeared with a little oil) followed by the pump itself.

The mounting bolts, pressure relief plug and sensors were torqued up, while access was good, the wiring for the sensors was fed through and connected.

The cover mating surfaces were cleaned up and a smear of sealant applied before it was attached to the pump...

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... and the cover bolts torqued up, finishing the job!

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Brake Disc

#32 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sun Aug 05, 2018 7:39 pm

With the bike able to be rolled, it was time to fix on the rear brake disc.

I gave this a good look over and the disc is well within service limits and, despite a slight lip, the disc is looking good ...

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... ...so this had a clean up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before it was mounted back onto the bevel box ...

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... ... with new bolts used, with the threads covered in medium thread lock, before being torqued up.

The back wheel was popped back on to restore the rolling ability and hopefully no need to remove the brake disc during the rest of the build.

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Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration

#33 Post by Grumpy Old Git » Mon Aug 06, 2018 4:05 pm

Looking bl@@dy good!

:cheers:
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BMW K75RT Ultima: Exhaust System

#34 Post by wollyjumperuk » Tue Aug 14, 2018 6:17 pm

As the main stand stops are on the exhaust, and I want to be able to use the main stand and still be able to move the bike, the exhaust was next.

Starting with the headers...

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... which were cleaned up with a damp cloth before using OptiGlanz stainless steel cleaner, followed by light use of wire brush attachment on a drill - for the more stubborn bits.

The headers were then polished up with Autosol Metal Polish and wire wool...

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... before being buffed up with a mop attachment on a drill.

The headers were then test fitted to ensure everything was as it should be.

This was then removed and as the manifold end of the exhaust is given a battering, they were masked up (leaving enough bare metal to seal in the manifold) before these were given a treatment of Kurust and a coat of black engine enamel...

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... to protect them in the future.

Once all the paintwork was cured, the headers were fitted onto the bike...

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... and torqued up, using a smear of nickel grease and new nuts.

The rest of the system was emptied of the old connection gasket ...

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... and a new one ordered (from Germany, as the UK seems to have more hen's teeth), and the system disassembled.

The end can was inspected...

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... before being cleaned up with a damp cloth, treatment using OptiGlanz stainless steel cleaner, followed by light use of wire brush attachment on a drill - for the more stubborn bits.

The exhaust were then polished up with Autosol Metal Polish and wire wool...

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... before being buffed up with a mop attachment on a drill.

The rubber stand stop was cleaned up and added back onto the exhaust before this was then put to one side to await the footrest hangers and the mounting bracket.

The bracket itself was in reasonably poor shape ...

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... but it was stripped and primer applied, so a good view of the remaining strength could be done.

But, while thinking about it overnight, the metal seemed a bit thin...

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... having lost about half it's thickness to corrosion. So a replacement was ordered but the primed mount will be used for the time being.

The exhaust sealing ring arrived from Germany and was slotted into the silencer...

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... in as far as the internal stop.

The exhaust was connected, using a fair amount of twisting and swearing, clamped up and mounted...

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... onto the awaiting bare footrest hangers.

Once the replacement mounting arrived, this was bolted straight on and all was done (I'll worry about the heat shield for the exhaust later, as it's a job in itself!)

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Footrest Hangers

#35 Post by wollyjumperuk » Tue Aug 14, 2018 6:24 pm

With the exhaust required for the main stand to be supported when in the up position, it needs to hang off something ... so time to get the footrest hangers done to coincide with the exhaust.

The footrests were stripped back, with all the rubbers footrests and other parts removed, leaving just the hangers ...

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... which were in turn stripped of paintwork, ready for reconditioning ...

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... and given a couple of coats of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Lacquer Enamel ...

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... and allowed to cure.

Once cured, the masking was removed...

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... and the edges tidied up with a scalpel.

The top mount of each footrest is an earthing point, so each was cleaned up to ensure a good electrical connection for the ABS system.

The footrests were mounted up...

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... and bought back together with the exhaust...

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... to allow the bike to be moved with a bit more ease.

As I don't want to be walking into the footrests continuously, these will be sorted later.

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Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration

#36 Post by Hoggs » Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:20 pm

Really enjoying this thread thanks @wollyjumperuk :cheers:
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BMW K75RT Ultima: Ignition Coils

#37 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:29 am

Time for another quick win I think!

During disassembly of the bike, the coils remained on the wiring loom as they were difficult to remove, but the time has come to remove them.

Each coil connector was sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and allowed to soak in before these were wiggled until they released from the coil pack

The electrical connection on the rear most coil pack had definitely suffered the most from corrosion….

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… but it was salvageable with some more electrical contact cleaner and a scotch pad.

With the coil packs freed, everything was pulled together…

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... and the cradle stripped down and the surface corrosion cleaned up followed by cleaning up the fittings to ensure no electrical conductivity via the mounting bolts, but good conductivity between the coil pack mounting and the earthing point for the cradle.

Once completed, the mounting fittings were used to bolt the cradle back into place…

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… the coil packs cleaned up, electrical contact points rubbed clean with a scotch pad and mounted onto the cradle.

The electrical conductivity was checked with the test coil contact isolated from the cradle and found to be good.

So the HT leads were connected to the spark plugs before being threaded through and onto the correct coil pack…

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… foremost to foremost, rearmost to rearmost and the remaining connection was obvious from there!

The electrical connection and covers will be done later, as access is needed for now.

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Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration

#38 Post by Trojax88 » Tue Sep 04, 2018 10:07 pm

Loving this!

Can't wait to see then next instalment - keep up the good work! :cheers:

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Re: BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration

#39 Post by wollyjumperuk » Wed Sep 12, 2018 7:14 pm

Evening all, I haven't forgotten about you all - just had some woodwork to get done ... normal service will be resumed in a couple of weeks! Watch this space for the next update.
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BMW K75RT Ultima Restoration: Pannier Rails

#40 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sun Sep 23, 2018 9:01 am

So, after some woodwork and a week in the Lake District on a walking holiday (even managed a chat with a friendly K75 owner), it was back to the project.

Next up are the pannier rails, these were pulled out of the pile of bits and checked over...

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... and with all looking good, these just had a tidy up with a wipe of WD-40...

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... the rails were good to go.

All the fixings were replaced with stainless nuts and bolts before the rails were reattached, using a little copper grease where the badly corroded fixings were...

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... and job's a good 'un, simple one after holiday!

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Gear Lever

#41 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:10 pm

With things coming back together and the bike being taken off the table from time to time, it seemed reasonable to get the gear lever done (as the brakes are not commissioned yet).

I would say I pulled all the parts together, but I just picked up the gear lever out of the box!

But I did strip it down in to the bewildering array of pieces ...

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... or 4 (lever, rubber, bolt and washer).

From here the lever was stripped using a wire brush attachment on a drill (well a stub of one as I've used it so much) before priming the lever in Autotek Etch Primer, top coating with Halfords Gloss Black Enamel before Halfords Clear Lacquer Enamel.

Once painted, everything was bought back together, the rubber fitted, the bolt and washer replaced  and the lever reattached to the bike...

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... another little job done!

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Airbox

#42 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sat Sep 29, 2018 5:23 pm

Time for another quick job, and as the top of the engine is looking a little bare ... that means airbox.

The airbox was stripped down, cleaned and all the parts pulled together ...

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... the base was bolted onto the engine ...

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... and the air filter replaced (as this was replaced at the last service according to previous owner and looks in very good condition).

The air flow sensor & controller unit, with the air delivery tube were added to the top section of the airbox ...

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... and popped onto the filter...

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... and clipped into place with 2 clips, while the third required stripping and repainting due to corrosion damage. Once cured the last clip was added and that's job done.

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BMW K75RT Ultima: Rear Suspension

#43 Post by wollyjumperuk » Fri Oct 05, 2018 4:29 pm

The state of the rear shock against the newly repainted swing arm, frame and bevel box has been annoying me for a few weeks now so, it was time to deal with it.

I got the unit out and into the vice to discover all the rubber parts were badly perished, but the operation was OK.

So, recommissioning it was, first job was compress the spring and undo the top cap...

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... so it was compressed well away from the cap with spring compressors, but the cap would not budge from the damper rod after over an hour of variously methods to remove it. So I was left scratching my head a bit, to say the least.

After a bit of research I had the option of sending it off for reconditioning, buy a used part or buy an upgrade unit. On the balance of cost, I plumbed for an upgraded unit...

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... which just looks a lot better and is easier all round.

The unit was slotted into place and stainless fittings used to replace the old bits, I figured that if I went for a new shock then I might as well make it a proper job...

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... and with that all on, job done.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
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BMW K75RT Ultima: Rear Brake

#44 Post by wollyjumperuk » Sat Oct 06, 2018 6:32 pm

Next in line was the rear brake assembly. As the K doesn't have linked brakes, I'm not forced to do the whole braking system at once.

Starting with laying everything out for the system ...

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... everything looks good, but dirty, except a rubber boot on one of the pistons in the rear caliper but just touching this caused it to return to it's seat, so no major issues there.

The caliper had the pins drifted out with a punch ...

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... to allow the removal of the pads and rubber boots, the caliper was in good working order, the strip down didn't go any further.

The bleed nipple was removed and bolts popped into the open brake fluid channels, before the caliper was cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before being remounted on the bike and the original grease nipple replaced ...

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... the fittings will be replaced once the paint work on the system is complete.

Next was the ABS sensor, the bracket of which had suffered a little from exposure to brake dust which was rubbed down and masked up. the masking covered the base of the internal side of the bracket to ensure the same clearance on the ABS sensor as before hand and avoiding any shimming up.

The bracket was given a couple of coats of Halfords Black Engine Enamel, as there will be some heat exposure ...

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... before being mounted back onto the rear caliper and torqued up to the setting in the Haynes Manual.

The sensor itself was cleaned up and the original shims used (again to preserve the original clearance) and mounted into the bracket.

The gap was measured with feeler gauges and found to be 0.4 mm, well within the 0.35 to 0.65 mm range stated, that's sorted then!

The next item to strip off and sort out are the brake fluid lines. These had the ends cleaned up with a wire wheel attachment to remove the road crud and surface corrosion build up, before 2 M10 bolts were used per line, as well as the original copper washers, to ensure no paint got in the area it would meet brake fluid in the future ...

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... before being masked up and given 2 coats of MOTIP Silver Brake Caliper Spray before being de-masked ...

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... and allowed to cure.

While I was doing that, I got to work on the ABS bracket and the bottom half of the battery box by cleaning up the battery box to find it was in quite good shape, so nothing really needed there, before treating the ABS mounting bracket to a wire brush drill attachment, Autoteck Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer.

Once everything was cured the battery box was bolted back onto the ABS bracket, using cleaned up fittings and new nuts/washers ...

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... before being bolted back onto the top of the gearbox so the basis of the reassembly was ready.

The master cylinder, reservoir and connecting hose were in good shape and fully functional so it was just cleaned up with Muc-Off motorcycle cleaner before being fitted to the back of the right hand footrest, using the original bolts (which were in good condition) ...

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... and bolted to the bike meaning the first part of the system is reinstated.

Next on the component list was the ABS pump for the rear brake, which showed both surface corrosion and had paint flaking off ...

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... so the areas with corrosion were stripped back to bare metal to ensure I got rid of it before the rest of the paintwork was rubbed back with a scotch pad to allow the new paint to key followed by a tac-clothing all over.

The pump was then masked up and given coats of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer allowing a cure between coats and a good long cure after painting was complete.

The ABS system was loosely bolted together...

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... to identify what was needed, allowing stainless bleed nipples, banjo bolts and copper washers to be ordered. Also, this allowed me to check hose routing to make sure nothing was fouling.

Next was the rear brake lever assembly, for which all of the bits were pulled together...

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... these bits were disassembled and the old bits all laid out with replacement pieces added to match as needed the parts remaining were cleaned up, with the brake lever itself polished...

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... the return stop and master cylinder plunger added, these will be adjusted on commissioning, and the bush lightly greased before these were offered up and bolted into place on the bike...

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... and the operation checked and the return spring fitted.

It looked like the return stop was going to impact the footrest stop as part of it's operation, so a self-adhesive rubber stop was added at the point of impact...

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... to protect the footrest stop and avoid the annoying impact noise.

With pretty much everything done and all the parts arrived, it was time to double check and get the assembly finalised.

The new stainless banjo bolts and bleed nipples were put in with appropriate copper washers...

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... to replace the old weather beaten fixing and torqued up.

As with all the other systems with fluid in, this will be added during the commissioning and therefore bled through at that time.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
Wollyjumperuk
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BMW K75RT Ultima: Throttle Bodies

#45 Post by wollyjumperuk » Thu Oct 11, 2018 5:30 pm

I guess the ability for the bike to have fuel and air mixture delivered to the inlet valves would be useful, and with the airbox in, the throttle bodies are next.

As everything is together in one lump at the moment it was just a case of breaking id down to see the condition and how big the job would be.

Everything looked OK, with the clips for the rubbers needing replacing and the throttle bodies caked in grime ...

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... so cleaning is the main job really.

The work started at the bottom, so reassembly could take place on the bike, so inlet rubbers were cleaned up lovely.

Each of the seats for the inlet rubbers were cleaned up in turn with a scraper and some 600 grit wet and dry paper before the rubbers were bolted back on ...

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... and clips applied.

Next the throttle bodies themselves were cleaned up with WD-40 and an old tooth brush (yes, it took as long as it sounds it might), before being slotted onto the rubbers and clamped down. These were accompanied by the injectors, mainly as I didn't want to lose them in the ever rising tide of bike parts! Quickly followed by the rubbers between the throttle bodies and plenum chamber ...

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... aided into position with a smear of WD-40.

The injectors were removed and brought together with the fuel rail but, given the injectors are sensitive pieces of kit (and I know they work), I decided not to paint these. But I did strip and paint the fuel rail ...

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... with the usual layers of Autotek Etch Primer, Halfords Gloss Black Enamel and Halfords Clear Enamel Lacquer, and allowing to cure before adding the injectors, injector electrical connections and offering these up to the crankcase before the injectors were inserted and the fuel rail bolted into place ...

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... and fuel pipes reconnected to both ends of the fuel rail.

The plenum chamber was cleaned up, clips for the joining rubbers added and internal faces smeared with WD-40. This allowed the fitting of the plenum chamber ...

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... before tightening all the claps to secure, before the breather for the crankcase was attached.

With everything for the assembly back together, job done.

As always, if you'd like further details, please see https://motocycleprojects.wordpress.com/
Wollyjumperuk
For more on my motorcycle projects, please see https://motorcycleprojects.wordpress.com